Petition for Quality, Objective Science Standards in WY

See petition text below.

Support Quality, Objective Science Standards in WY

Dear Wyoming State Board of Education member and Governor Matt Mead,

We, the undersigned, are writing to address the topic of the Next Generation Science Standards. It is our understanding that the budget amendment, which blocked funding for the NGSS was to be effective immediately. We support the amendment that was not only passed by our Wyoming Legislature but also signed into law by Governor Matt Mead on March 5, 2014.

The Next Generation Science Standards are not high quality science education. In fact, the NGSS received a mediocre “C” rating from the Fordham Institute. Our children deserve the best possible science education, and the NGSS will not accomplish that task. The Fordham report stresses concerns over the lack of advanced content in the standards, making it impossible to derive a high school physics or chemistry course. This will not adequately prepare our students for STEM careers.

Furthermore, the NGSS are subject to a federal lawsuit in the state of Kansas. That lawsuit will very likely end up in the 10th circuit court which has jurisdiction over six states including Wyoming. Why would Wyoming spend time, money and resources to implement a set of standards that may be ruled unconstitutional?

Lastly, the NGSS teach multiple theories as fact, such as man-made global warming and Darwinian evolution. The NGSS fail to demonstrate how humans have had a positive impact on the earth and the responsible use of natural resources. Wyoming’s economy revolves around mining and agriculture, and the NGSS have a heavy negative slant at the use of such resources.

Wyoming should have top-notch science standards that instruct students in an objective and non-political manner. The State Board of Education has the opportunity to go back to the drawing board and draft standards that are both high-quality and politically neutral. Thank you for abiding by the legislation that was passed during the 2014 budget session.

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Dear Wyoming State Board of Education member and Governor Matt Mead,

We, the undersigned, are writing to address the topic of the Next Generation Science Standards. It is our understanding that the budget amendment, which blocked funding for the NGSS was to be effective immediately. We support the amendment that was not only passed by our Wyoming Legislature but also signed into law by Governor Matt Mead on March 5, 2014.

The Next Generation Science Standards are not high quality science education. In fact, the NGSS received a mediocre “C” rating from the Fordham Institute. Our children deserve the best possible science education, and the NGSS will not accomplish that task. The Fordham report stresses concerns over the lack of advanced content in the standards, making it impossible to derive a high school physics or chemistry course. This will not adequately prepare our students for STEM careers.

Furthermore, the NGSS are subject to a federal lawsuit in the state of Kansas. That lawsuit will very likely end up in the 10th circuit court which has jurisdiction over six states including Wyoming. Why would Wyoming spend time, money and resources to implement a set of standards that may be ruled unconstitutional?

Lastly, the NGSS teach multiple theories as fact, such as man-made global warming and Darwinian evolution. The NGSS fail to demonstrate how humans have had a positive impact on the earth and the responsible use of natural resources. Wyoming’s economy revolves around mining and agriculture, and the NGSS have a heavy negative slant at the use of such resources.

Wyoming should have top-notch science standards that instruct students in an objective and non-political manner. The State Board of Education has the opportunity to go back to the drawing board and draft standards that are both high-quality and politically neutral. Thank you for abiding by the legislation that was passed during the 2014 budget session.


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